Misinformation: the Danger

Everyone thinks. It is our nature to do so. But much of our thinking, left to itself, is biased, distorted, partial, uninformed, or prejudiced.

As citizens, we make decisions, sometimes without taking the time to familiarize ourselves with the relevant issues and positions; without thinking about the long-run implications of what is being proposed; without paying attention to how politicians manipulate us by flattery or vague and empty promises. We make decisions what to believe, who to support, who to vote for, whether to vote and how close a politician believes in what we believe. Politicians often make policy, laws and decisions based on their own political ideology and alignment.

Citizens need to utilize critical thinking by:   

-Raising vital questions and problems, formulating them clearly and precisely.

-Gathering and assessing relevant information, considers the source of information. Look at multiple sources. 

-Separate opinion versus fact-based information from research/experts.

-Come to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions, test them against relevant criteria and standards. 

-Think open-mindedly within alternative systems of thought, recognizing and assessing, as needs be, their assumptions, implications, and practical consequences.

-Communicate effectively with others to figure out solutions to complex problems. 

-Behave as if your life depended on it – because it may!

In this “Age of Enlightenment” despite our sophisticated digital devices, we are systematically influenced by sound bite journalism, opinion based reporting, news flashes, highlights, headlines, and twitter-verse commentary. All provide great opportunity to mislead, misrepresent because they fail to provide factual comprehensive, in-depth analysis, facts and evidence. 

Increasingly, people are streaming information after the fact, as facts change at the speed of light, too vague and blurred to represent reliable information. In lieu of evidence and facts, we are left to our own devices and biases to decide the relevance, validity or truthfulness of any given story.

Source: From the Foundation for Critical Thinking/criticalthinking.org

In the age of Covid 19 – why would you not err on the side of caution and take a few basic precautions to protect yourself and your family? The health and scientific communities are nearly unequivocally unified in advising the public saying: “wear a facemark, maintain social distance, wash your hands.” The rest of the world, with access to doing these measures, does so routinely.  Not only have other countries been able to reduce the prevalence of Covid 19, but other contagious illness as well. The Covid pandemic is world wide. In the United States, it has remains out of control. It is not coincidental that there is a simultaneous dearth of critical thinking and a prevalence of behavior that appears to be based on opinion and misplaced political ideology. 

As of this writing, per the John Hopkins web site, coronavirus.jhu.edu The information is updated hourly:

Global Confirmed: 20,936,041

Global Deaths: 759,844

Confirmed in USA: 5,254,171

Deaths in USA: 167,242

Your own behavioral decisions factor into determining your risk for becoming a Covid 19 case.  Your own risk factors: (i.e. age, race, health and economic status, access to health care, coexisting conditions effecting health status) determine whether you are more likely to survive, should you contact Covid 19.

Think critically.  Do your own research and due diligence when you follow the news and mindfully decide on your behavior and the behavior you model to your children and others.

For critical thinking, ask yourself these five basic questions:

  • What is the issue and the conclusion?
  • What are the reasons?
  • What are the assumptions?
  • Are there any fallacies in the reasoning?
  • How good is the evidence?

Let’s give critical thinking a try:

What are your thoughts – based on critical thinking – of this recently reported news story that appeared on line? 

Russian Vaccine to Roll Out Within Weeks

You only get one shot at public trust. Despite widespread skepticism over Vladimir Putin’s claim that his country has developed a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine, Russia’s now announced that medics will be inoculated within two weeks. Not everyone is unbelieving: The Philippines says it’ll launch clinical trials for the preventative injections this fall and Russia’s already arranged to mass produce it in Brazil. Meanwhile, anti-vaxxers on U.S. social media are also spreading conspiracy theories about other vaccines, and a May poll found that one-third of Americans say they won’t get the shot even when and if it becomes available. 

Sources: Al Jazeera, Reuters, CNN

The Thinker

What do YOU think?

What will YOU do?

What will be the RESULTS of what YOU do?

Misinformation and Critical thinking…! It matters!

Happy Independence Day!

Information is linked from the Kitsap Health Department. Search the health department specific to your location for information including about Covid-19 case updates in your locale and other topics of interest to you.

Happy Independence Day!

Here are some fun facts about this national holiday, provided by the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Archives:

The Declaration of Independence was approved July 4, 1776 by the 2nd Continental Congress, leading 13 colonies to gain Independence from England. The declaration was signed by 56 congressional members, among them a committee of five who drafted the declaration: Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Roger Sherman and Robert Livingston.

Most of the congressional delegates didn’t sign it until August 2. John Hancock, President of the Congress, was first and there were 55 others. A few refused. George Washington didn’t sign it as he was away with his troops.

When the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, there were about 2.5 million people living in the new free nation. As of July 4, 2019, there were estimated to be 328 million people living in the United States.

Read the Declaration of Independence and more about its fascinating history from the National Archives here.

May the 4th be with YOU!
Flag by Sheila Guizzetti, Copyright 2010
Seize the day!
Self Portrait by Sheila Guizzetti Copyright 2010

Enjoy Independence Day, be safe!
Fireworks Image by Sheila Guizzetti, Copyright 2010

News & Information:

COVID-19 Testing Results Update for Kitsap County as of 10 a.m. July 4

Fireworks Safety Tips – from kidshealth.org

If fireworks are legal where you live, keep these safety tips in mind:

  • Kids should never play with fireworks. Things like firecrackers, rockets, and sparklers are just too dangerous. If you give kids sparklers, make sure they keep them outside and away from the face, clothing, and hair. Sparklers can reach 1,800°F (982°C) — hot enough to melt gold.
  • Buy only legal fireworks (legal fireworks have a label with the manufacturer’s name and directions; illegal ones are unlabeled), and store them in a cool, dry place. Illegal fireworks usually go by the names M-80, M100, blockbuster, or quarterpounder. These explosives were banned in 1966, but still account for many fireworks injuries.
  • Never try to make your own fireworks.
  • Always use fireworks outside and have a bucket of water and a hose nearby in case of accidents.
  • Steer clear of others setting off fireworks. They can backfire or shoot off in the wrong direction.
  • Never throw or point fireworks at someone, even as a joke.
  • Don’t hold fireworks in your hand or have any part of your body over them while lighting. Wear eye protection, and don’t carry fireworks in your pocket — the friction could set them off.
  • Point fireworks away from homes, and keep away from brush and leaves and flammable substances. The National Fire Protection Association estimates that local fire departments respond to more 50,000 fires caused by fireworks each year.
  • Light one firework at a time (not in glass or metal containers), and never relight a dud.
  • Don’t allow kids to pick up pieces of fireworks after an event. Some may still be ignited and can explode at any time.
  • Soak all fireworks in a bucket of water before throwing them in the trash can.
  • Think about your pet. Animals have sensitive ears and can be very frightened or stressed by the Fourth of July and other big celebrations. Keep pets indoors to reduce the risk that they’ll run loose or get injured.

If an Injury Happens

If a child is injured by fireworks, immediately go to a doctor or hospital.

Welcome to Nurse Press!

Hello and welcome to my new blog.

My name is Sheila Guizzetti. I am a recently retired registered nurse. Through my 20+ year nursing career, I worked in medical/surgical, behavioral health, hospice, and long term care nursing before retiring in 2020.

All of us have experienced life changes and challenges from the Covid-19 pandemic. Part of the reason I wanted to blog is to help separate the facts from fiction around Covid-19.

I strongly advise mindfully practicing safety measures advised by the CDC, Health Departments, and most medical professionals: especially social distancing, hand washing, and wearing a face mask in public.

The goal is to stay well and prevent contracting and spreading the virus. The other focus of this blog will be on the impacts of the ever-evolving politics and policies related to nursing, nurses, and the public. I plan to present information about Covid-19 and other timely medical topics. I plan to present stories from nurses and others. I enjoy volunteering in political events and hope this site will also serve as an information link about nursing issues and political activism. 

I am married, raised four children, now grown, and take great joy in my seven grandchildren. My husband and I reside in Washington state. I enjoy musical theatre and have enjoyed many musicals at the 5th Avenue Theatre. As a sidebar, I am reminding all who love the musical theatre that the musical Hamilton will be on the Disney + for screening tomorrow, July 3rd. I saw the live musical when it was in Seattle. It is a must-see for viewing! Thank you for checking out my blog. I welcome your questions, concerns, comments, and stories to share.