Happy Independence Day!

Information is linked from the Kitsap Health Department. Search the health department specific to your location for information including about Covid-19 case updates in your locale and other topics of interest to you.

Happy Independence Day!

Here are some fun facts about this national holiday, provided by the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Archives:

The Declaration of Independence was approved July 4, 1776 by the 2nd Continental Congress, leading 13 colonies to gain Independence from England. The declaration was signed by 56 congressional members, among them a committee of five who drafted the declaration: Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Roger Sherman and Robert Livingston.

Most of the congressional delegates didn’t sign it until August 2. John Hancock, President of the Congress, was first and there were 55 others. A few refused. George Washington didn’t sign it as he was away with his troops.

When the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, there were about 2.5 million people living in the new free nation. As of July 4, 2019, there were estimated to be 328 million people living in the United States.

Read the Declaration of Independence and more about its fascinating history from the National Archives here.

May the 4th be with YOU!
Flag by Sheila Guizzetti, Copyright 2010
Seize the day!
Self Portrait by Sheila Guizzetti Copyright 2010

Enjoy Independence Day, be safe!
Fireworks Image by Sheila Guizzetti, Copyright 2010

News & Information:

COVID-19 Testing Results Update for Kitsap County as of 10 a.m. July 4

Fireworks Safety Tips – from kidshealth.org

If fireworks are legal where you live, keep these safety tips in mind:

  • Kids should never play with fireworks. Things like firecrackers, rockets, and sparklers are just too dangerous. If you give kids sparklers, make sure they keep them outside and away from the face, clothing, and hair. Sparklers can reach 1,800°F (982°C) — hot enough to melt gold.
  • Buy only legal fireworks (legal fireworks have a label with the manufacturer’s name and directions; illegal ones are unlabeled), and store them in a cool, dry place. Illegal fireworks usually go by the names M-80, M100, blockbuster, or quarterpounder. These explosives were banned in 1966, but still account for many fireworks injuries.
  • Never try to make your own fireworks.
  • Always use fireworks outside and have a bucket of water and a hose nearby in case of accidents.
  • Steer clear of others setting off fireworks. They can backfire or shoot off in the wrong direction.
  • Never throw or point fireworks at someone, even as a joke.
  • Don’t hold fireworks in your hand or have any part of your body over them while lighting. Wear eye protection, and don’t carry fireworks in your pocket — the friction could set them off.
  • Point fireworks away from homes, and keep away from brush and leaves and flammable substances. The National Fire Protection Association estimates that local fire departments respond to more 50,000 fires caused by fireworks each year.
  • Light one firework at a time (not in glass or metal containers), and never relight a dud.
  • Don’t allow kids to pick up pieces of fireworks after an event. Some may still be ignited and can explode at any time.
  • Soak all fireworks in a bucket of water before throwing them in the trash can.
  • Think about your pet. Animals have sensitive ears and can be very frightened or stressed by the Fourth of July and other big celebrations. Keep pets indoors to reduce the risk that they’ll run loose or get injured.

If an Injury Happens

If a child is injured by fireworks, immediately go to a doctor or hospital.

Hamilton!

For those maintaining social isolation at home and looking for activities to do today: I highly recommend watching Hamilton, on Disney + now streaming for a short time only! 

Remember when you couldn’t get the theatre tickets? This movie features the original cast! It is wonderfully inspiring, musically soaring, and a timely gift from Disney+ to the nation reeling with the Covid-19 pandemic and general civil unrest seeking a better union, as we move towards Independence Day on the 4th of July. The movie rights to Hamilton were sold to Disney+ and I appreciate that they are streaming the production today. I strongly advocate for you to share this experience with your family as it serves as a valuable lesson in American Revolutionary history and speaks to the challenging times in which we live. 

Just a warning for parents: there are a few “salty” words. War is hell after all.

Welcome to Nurse Press!

Hello and welcome to my new blog.

My name is Sheila Guizzetti. I am a recently retired registered nurse. Through my 20+ year nursing career, I worked in medical/surgical, behavioral health, hospice, and long term care nursing before retiring in 2020.

All of us have experienced life changes and challenges from the Covid-19 pandemic. Part of the reason I wanted to blog is to help separate the facts from fiction around Covid-19.

I strongly advise mindfully practicing safety measures advised by the CDC, Health Departments, and most medical professionals: especially social distancing, hand washing, and wearing a face mask in public.

The goal is to stay well and prevent contracting and spreading the virus. The other focus of this blog will be on the impacts of the ever-evolving politics and policies related to nursing, nurses, and the public. I plan to present information about Covid-19 and other timely medical topics. I plan to present stories from nurses and others. I enjoy volunteering in political events and hope this site will also serve as an information link about nursing issues and political activism. 

I am married, raised four children, now grown, and take great joy in my seven grandchildren. My husband and I reside in Washington state. I enjoy musical theatre and have enjoyed many musicals at the 5th Avenue Theatre. As a sidebar, I am reminding all who love the musical theatre that the musical Hamilton will be on the Disney + for screening tomorrow, July 3rd. I saw the live musical when it was in Seattle. It is a must-see for viewing! Thank you for checking out my blog. I welcome your questions, concerns, comments, and stories to share.